Snow Mushroom (Tremella Fusciformis)

Tremella Fuciformis, aka Snow Mushroom, has an ethereal white jelly-like appearance. Studies have shown that Tremella Fuciformis helps protect against cognitive decline (Alzheimer's Disease and MCI), as well as increase overall learning and memory ability. Tremella Fuciformis also alleviates free radical activity and reduces inflammation in the brain.

References

Park, K. J., Lee, S., Kim, H., Yamazaki, M., Chiba, K., & Ha, H. (2007). The Neuroprotective and Neurotrophic Effects of Tremella fuciformis in PC12h Cells. Mycobiology,35(1), 11. doi:10.4489/myco.2007.35.1.011

Conclusion: “When cells were treated with the hot water extract of T. fuciformis prior to β-amyloid peptide treatment (active domain of A peptide 25~35 treated), toxicity was significantly diminished (p<0.01). These results suggest that T. fuciformis might potentially be used as a precautionary agent in neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer's disease, etc.”

 

Shen, T., Duan, C., Chen, B., Li, M., Ruan, Y., Xu, D., . . . Wang, C. (2017). Tremella fuciformis polysaccharide suppresses hydrogen peroxide-triggered injury of human skin fibroblasts via upregulation of SIRT1. Molecular Medicine Reports,16(2), 1340-1346. doi:10.3892/mmr.2017.6754

Conclusion:“These results indicated that TFPS alleviated hydrogen peroxide‑induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in skin fibroblasts via upregulation of SIRT1 expression, indicating that TFPS may act as a potential therapeutic agent for oxidative‑stress‑associated skin diseases and aging.”

 

Ruan, Y., Li, H., Pu, L., Shen, T., & Jin, Z. (2018). Tremella fuciformis Polysaccharides Attenuate Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Macrophages through miR-155. Analytical Cellular Pathology,2018, 1-10. doi:10.1155/2018/5762371

Conclusion: “In this study, we investigated the protective effects of TFPS in LPS-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in macrophages and sought to gain novel insights into how TFPS regulates macrophage inflammation. Our results revealed that TFPS could attenuate free radical production and alleviate the inflammatory reaction by regulating the nuclear translocation of NFκB. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms of TFPS in the regulation of macrophage inflammation and a new potential treatment for inflammation-related diseases.”

 

Ban, S., Lee, S. L., Jeong, H. S., Lim, S. M., Park, S., Hong, Y. S., & Kim, J. E. (2018). Efficacy and Safety of Tremella fuciformis in Individuals with Subjective Cognitive Impairment: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Medicinal Food,21(4), 400-407. doi:10.1089/jmf.2017.4063

Conclusion: “The individuals in the TF group showed greater improvements in the total scores on the subjective memory complaint questionnaire compared with those in the placebo group. There were also significantly greater improvements in short-term memory and executive functions in the TF group relative to the placebo group. Exploratory analysis demonstrated that there were significant group-by-visit interactions on the left precuneus, right supramarginal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, and right postcentral gyrus at corrected P < .05”

 

Kim, J. H., Ha, H., Lee, M., Kang, J., Kim, H., Lee, S., . . . Shim, I. (2007). Effect of Tremella fuciformis on the Neurite Outgrowth of PC12h Cells and the Improvement of Memory in Rats. Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin,30(4), 708-714. doi:10.1248/bpb.30.708

Conclusion: “Oral daily treatment with TF (100 or 400 mg/kg) for 14 consecutive days significantly reversed the scopolamine-induced deficit in learning and memory, and it alleviated decrease in cholinergic immunoreactivity induced by scopolamine in the medial septum and hippocampus.”

Li, H., Lee, H., Kim, S., Moon, B., & Lee, C. (2014). Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Activities of Methanol Extracts of Tremella fuciformis and Its Major Phenolic Acids. Journal of Food Science,79(4). doi:10.1111/1750-3841.12393

Wen, L., Gao, Q., Ma, C., Ge, Y., You, L., Liu, R. H., . . . Liu, D. (2016). Effect of polysaccharides from Tremella fuciformis on UV-induced photoaging. Journal of Functional Foods,20, 400-410. doi:10.1016/j.jff.2015.11.014

Conclusion: “TP could efficiently reduce the water and collagen losses of the skin, and inhibit the increase of glycosaminoglycans. Moreover, a histopathological study showed that, UV-induced skin structural alterations were alleviated as well as repairing endogenous collagen breakdown and maintaining the ratio of type I/III collagen, after oral treatment of TP. The activities of SOD, GSH-Px and CAT were increased compared to the irradiated control group without treatment. Accordingly, TP can be used as a potential functional food supplement for skin function protection.”

 




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Eleuthero Root

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Also known as Siberian Ginseng, this adaptogen is the “king” of them all. There are more published studies on Eleuthero Root than any other herb (wow!). This superherb decreases fatigue by increasing your work and exercise capacity without the “crash” that comes with a morning cup of coffee. With this herb, you’ll also recover faster from acute stress and intense workouts. Check out the research for more interesting tidbits on what Eleuthero can do.
Reishi Mushroom

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Reishi is an ethereal yellow-red mushroom that has been used as a medicine for over two thousand years. It both regulates and restores the body to homeostasis as well as relieves one from stress.
Turmeric

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This bright yellow root has been used in both Indian and Chinese traditional medicine for centuries. Curcumin, the active chemical compound in turmeric, has anti-inflammatory properties that can reduce depression and pain. Studies have shown that oral intake of curcumin helps with acne, atopic dermatitis, and facial photoaging (sun damage). In this formulation, turmeric is paired with black pepper in order to increase the bioavailability of curcumin.

 

Further Reading

Thangapazham, R. L., Sharma, A., & Maheshwari, R. K. (n.d.). Beneficial Role Of Curcumin In Skin Diseases. ADVANCES IN EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY The Molecular Targets and Therapeutic Uses of Curcumin in Health and Disease, 343-357. doi:10.1007/978-0-387-46401-5_15

 

Vaughn, A. R., Branum, A., & Sivamani, R. K. (2016). Effects of Turmeric (Curcuma longa) on Skin Health: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Evidence. Phytotherapy Research, 30(8), 1243-1264. doi:10.1002/ptr.5640

 

Disilvestro, R. A., Joseph, E., Zhao, S., & Bomser, J. (2012). Diverse effects of a low dose supplement of lipidated curcumin in healthy middle aged people. Nutrition Journal, 11(1). doi:10.1186/1475-2891-11-79

 

Kalpravidh, R. W., Siritanaratkul, N., Insain, P., Charoensakdi, R., Panichkul, N., Hatairaktham, S., . . . Fucharoen, S. (2010). Improvement in oxidative stress and antioxidant parameters in β-thalassemia/Hb E patients treated with curcuminoids. Clinical Biochemistry, 43(4-5), 424-429. doi:10.1016/j.clinbiochem.2009.10.057

 

Al-Jassabi, S., Ahmed, K., & Abdulla, M. (2012). Antioxidant Effect of Curcumin Against Microcystin- LR-Induced Renal Oxidative Damage in Balb/c Mice. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research, 11(4). doi:10.4314/tjpr.v11i4.2

 

Biswas, J., Sinha, D., Mukherjee, S., Roy, S., Siddiqi, M., & Roy, M. (2010). Curcumin protects DNA damage in a chronically arsenic-exposed population of West Bengal. Human & Experimental Toxicology, 29(6), 513-524. doi:10.1177/0960327109359020

 

Chainani-Wu, N., Madden, E., Lozada-Nur, F., & Silverman, S. (2012). High-dose curcuminoids are efficacious in the reduction in symptoms and signs of oral lichen planus. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 66(5), 752-760. doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2011.04.022

 

Khajehdehi, P., Pakfetrat, M., Javidnia, K., Azad, F., Malekmakan, L., Nasab, M. H., & Dehghanzadeh, G. (2011). Oral supplementation of turmeric attenuates proteinuria, transforming growth factor-β and interleukin-8 levels in patients with overt type 2 diabetic nephropathy: A randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled study. Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, 45(5), 365-370. doi:10.3109/00365599.2011.585622

 

Khajehdehi, P., Zanjaninejad, B., Aflaki, E., Nazarinia, M., Azad, F., Malekmakan, L., & Dehghanzadeh, G. (2012). Oral Supplementation of Turmeric Decreases Proteinuria, Hematuria, and Systolic Blood Pressure in Patients Suffering From Relapsing or Refractory Lupus Nephritis: A Randomized and Placebo-controlled Study. Journal of Renal Nutrition, 22(1), 50-57. doi:10.1053/j.jrn.2011.03.002

 

Disilvestro, R. A., Joseph, E., Zhao, S., & Bomser, J. (2012). Diverse effects of a low dose supplement of lipidated curcumin in healthy middle aged people. Nutrition Journal, 11(1). doi:10.1186/1475-2891-11-79

 

Kalpravidh, R. W., Siritanaratkul, N., Insain, P., Charoensakdi, R., Panichkul, N., Hatairaktham, S., . . . Fucharoen, S. (2010). Improvement in oxidative stress and antioxidant parameters in β-thalassemia/Hb E patients treated with curcuminoids. Clinical Biochemistry, 43(4-5), 424-429. doi:10.1016/j.clinbiochem.2009.10.057


Pungcharoenkul, K., & Thongnopnua, P. (2011). Effect of Different Curcuminoid Supplement Dosages on TotalIn VivoAntioxidant Capacity and Cholesterol Levels of Healthy Human Subjects. Phytotherapy Research, 25(11), 1721-1726. doi:10.1002/ptr.3608